Camp Atterbury WWII Events Page

Welcome to the Camp Atterbury WWII Events Site

 

PTO Event - July 7, 8 & 9, 2017

 

This event will be back on the North side of post at FOB 3 and Training area 115. It is wooded and some what rugged with a creek running through it and closely resembles the jungles of New Georgia. 

 

 

 

 

 Full Immersion Event - October 27, 28 & 29, 2017 

 

"Market Garden" 

 

Located in the same area as the October 2016 Event. 

 

Both Events will be at Camp Atterbury Indiana hosted by Third Army Historical Society, Inc.
 
 
 
 
For those of you that have been to one of our events before you know that it's an awesome place to play!

 

 (Event Times and Training Areas Subject to Change!)    

 

 

 

 FYI!!!  We do not have the funds to assist with transportation of vehicles. IF we did that we would have to charge $75.00 per person for the event to do that and pay all the bills. 

 

 

Additional information on the Jungle Scenario is listed below.

 

 



This event will be on the South West end of post. It is wooded and rugged and closly resembles the jungles of New Georgia.  Cost for the event will be 25.00 pre registered and 35.00 Walk - on's at the event.
To Pre-registrer by Pay Pal go to your Pay Pal Acct. and use; thirdarmyhistoricalsociety@yahoo.com
Both Army and Marine units will participate. You will be in the Field and there is ample place to set your tent up. and there is rest rooms avalable at registration. So bring your Rations and plenty of ammo!!
EVENT POC; Dave Weakley, dwweakley@yahoo.com

Directions to the south gate State Rd 46 (Jonathon Moore Pike) to 325 W. turn right on 325 W.then go to 100 N. turn left on 100 N.( W George Town Rd.) go to the South Gate
Or S.R. 46 to 500 W. turn right to George Town Rd. turn left to the South Gate.

Info on the campain
Before 1942 hardly anybody had ever heard of New Georgia, and after 1943 few people would ever hear of it again. Nothing important had ever happened there before, and nothing important afterwards. But for an intense five-month period from June through November 1943, the New Georgia Group of islands would see fierce fighting on land, sea and in the air—and some of the worst American strategic and tactical planning of the war.
The New Georgia Group in the Central Solomons, on the west side of “The Slot,” is 125 miles long and 40 miles wide. It includes 12 large habitable islands, several dozen small ones, barrier islands, fringing coral reefs and innumerable uncharted coral heads. Like most of the other large Solomon Islands, the New Georgia group is thickly covered by some of the most difficult jungle terrain in the world. So thick is the top canopy that twilight prevails even in broad daylight. The ground beneath is covered with many steep ridges and small rivers—most of which are unseen in aerial photography. Where the terrain flattens near the coastline and the rivers deposit silt carried down from the interior highlands, mangrove swamps usually result. Just south of the equator, the islands are always hot and rainy, with high daytime temperatures often in excess of 100 degrees. Humidity runs near 100%, and as a result the usual tropical diseases, malaria and dengue fever, proliferate. Constant moisture promotes many debilitating fungal skin conditions, commonly referred to as “jungle rot.” Metal rusts seemingly overnight, and in WW II cloth and leather literally rotted off the soldiers’ equipment. In 1943 there were virtually no trails or roads in the interiors of these islands, and when they were eventually cut, the passage of even a company-sized unit turned the footing into a sea of mud. The only large low flat area on New Georgia was the former copra plantation zone around Munda airfield near the south tip of its northwest corner.

 

 




This event will be on the South West end of post. It is wooded and rugged and closly resembles the jungles of New Georgia

This event will be on the South West end of post. It is wooded and rugged and closly resembles the jungles of New Georgia.  Cost for the event will be 25.00 pre registered and 35.00 Walk - on's at the event.
To Pre-registrer by Pay Pal go to your Pay Pal Acct. and use;thirdarmyhistoricalsociety@yahoo.com
Both Army and Marine units will participate. You will be in the Field and there is ample place to set your tent up. and there is rest rooms avalable at registration. So bring your Rations and plenty of ammo!!
EVENT POC; Dave Weakley, dwweakley@yahoo.com

Directions to the south gate State Rd 46 (Jonathon Moore Pike) to 325 W. turn right on 325 W.then go to 100 N. turn left on 100 N.( W George Town Rd.) go to the South Gate
Or S.R. 46 to 500 W. turn right to George Town Rd. turn left to the South Gate.

Info on the campain
Before 1942 hardly anybody had ever heard of New Georgia, and after 1943 few people would ever hear of it again. Nothing important had ever happened there before, and nothing important afterwards. But for an intense five-month period from June through November 1943, the New Georgia Group of islands would see fierce fighting on land, sea and in the air—and some of the worst American strategic and tactical planning of the war.
The New Georgia Group in the Central Solomons, on the west side of “The Slot,” is 125 miles long and 40 miles wide. It includes 12 large habitable islands, several dozen small ones, barrier islands, fringing coral reefs and innumerable uncharted coral heads. Like most of the other large Solomon Islands, the New Georgia group is thickly covered by some of the most difficult jungle terrain in the world. So thick is the top canopy that twilight prevails even in broad daylight. The ground beneath is covered with many steep ridges and small rivers—most of which are unseen in aerial photography. Where the terrain flattens near the coastline and the rivers deposit silt carried down from the interior highlands, mangrove swamps usually result. Just south of the equator, the islands are always hot and rainy, with high daytime temperatures often in excess of 100 degrees. Humidity runs near 100%, and as a result the usual tropical diseases, malaria and dengue fever, proliferate. Constant moisture promotes many debilitating fungal skin conditions, commonly referred to as “jungle rot.” Metal rusts seemingly overnight, and in WW II cloth and leather literally rotted off the soldiers’ equipment. In 1943 there were virtually no trails or roads in the interiors of these islands, and when they were eventually cut, the passage of even a company-sized unit turned the footing into a sea of mud. The only large low flat area on New Georgia was the former copra plantation zone around Munda airfield near the south tip of its northwest corner.

This event will be on the South West end of post. It is wooded and rugged and closly resembles the jungles of New Georgia.  Cost for the event will be 25.00 pre registered and 35.00 Walk - on's at the event.
To Pre-registrer by Pay Pal go to your Pay Pal Acct. and use;thirdarmyhistoricalsociety@yahoo.com
Both Army and Marine units will participate. You will be in the Field and there is ample place to set your tent up. and there is rest rooms avalable at registration. So bring your Rations and plenty of ammo!!
EVENT POC; Dave Weakley, dwweakley@yahoo.com

Directions to the south gate State Rd 46 (Jonathon Moore Pike) to 325 W. turn right on 325 W.then go to 100 N. turn left on 100 N.( W George Town Rd.) go to the South Gate
Or S.R. 46 to 500 W. turn right to George Town Rd. turn left to the South Gate.

Info on the campain
Before 1942 hardly anybody had ever heard of New Georgia, and after 1943 few people would ever hear of it again. Nothing important had ever happened there before, and nothing important afterwards. But for an intense five-month period from June through November 1943, the New Georgia Group of islands would see fierce fighting on land, sea and in the air—and some of the worst American strategic and tactical planning of the war.
The New Georgia Group in the Central Solomons, on the west side of “The Slot,” is 125 miles long and 40 miles wide. It includes 12 large habitable islands, several dozen small ones, barrier islands, fringing coral reefs and innumerable uncharted coral heads. Like most of the other large Solomon Islands, the New Georgia group is thickly covered by some of the most difficult jungle terrain in the world. So thick is the top canopy that twilight prevails even in broad daylight. The ground beneath is covered with many steep ridges and small rivers—most of which are unseen in aerial photography. Where the terrain flattens near the coastline and the rivers deposit silt carried down from the interior highlands, mangrove swamps usually result. Just south of the equator, the islands are always hot and rainy, with high daytime temperatures often in excess of 100 degrees. Humidity runs near 100%, and as a result the usual tropical diseases, malaria and dengue fever, proliferate. Constant moisture promotes many debilitating fungal skin conditions, commonly referred to as “jungle rot.” Metal rusts seemingly overnight, and in WW II cloth and leather literally rotted off the soldiers’ equipment. In 1943 there were virtually no trails or roads in the interiors of these islands, and when they were eventually cut, the passage of even a company-sized unit turned the footing into a sea of mud. The only large low flat area on New Georgia was the former copra plantation zone around Munda airfield near the south tip of its northwest corner.

This event will be on the South West end of post. It is wooded and rugged and closly resembles the jungles of New Georgia.  Cost for the event will be 25.00 pre registered and 35.00 Walk - on's at the event.
To Pre-registrer by Pay Pal go to your Pay Pal Acct. and use;thirdarmyhistoricalsociety@yahoo.com
Both Army and Marine units will participate. You will be in the Field and there is ample place to set your tent up. and there is rest rooms avalable at registration. So bring your Rations and plenty of ammo!!
EVENT POC; Dave Weakley, dwweakley@yahoo.com

Directions to the south gate State Rd 46 (Jonathon Moore Pike) to 325 W. turn right on 325 W.then go to 100 N. turn left on 100 N.( W George Town Rd.) go to the South Gate
Or S.R. 46 to 500 W. turn right to George Town Rd. turn left to the South Gate.

Info on the campain
Before 1942 hardly anybody had ever heard of New Georgia, and after 1943 few people would ever hear of it again. Nothing important had ever happened there before, and nothing important afterwards. But for an intense five-month period from June through November 1943, the New Georgia Group of islands would see fierce fighting on land, sea and in the air—and some of the worst American strategic and tactical planning of the war.
The New Georgia Group in the Central Solomons, on the west side of “The Slot,” is 125 miles long and 40 miles wide. It includes 12 large habitable islands, several dozen small ones, barrier islands, fringing coral reefs and innumerable uncharted coral heads. Like most of the other large Solomon Islands, the New Georgia group is thickly covered by some of the most difficult jungle terrain in the world. So thick is the top canopy that twilight prevails even in broad daylight. The ground beneath is covered with many steep ridges and small rivers—most of which are unseen in aerial photography. Where the terrain flattens near the coastline and the rivers deposit silt carried down from the interior highlands, mangrove swamps usually result. Just south of the equator, the islands are always hot and rainy, with high daytime temperatures often in excess of 100 degrees. Humidity runs near 100%, and as a result the usual tropical diseases, malaria and dengue fever, proliferate. Constant moisture promotes many debilitating fungal skin conditions, commonly referred to as “jungle rot.” Metal rusts seemingly overnight, and in WW II cloth and leather literally rotted off the soldiers’ equipment. In 1943 there were virtually no trails or roads in the interiors of these islands, and when they were eventually cut, the passage of even a company-sized unit turned the footing into a sea of mud. The only large low flat area on New Georgia was the former copra plantation zone around Munda airfield near the south tip of its northwest corner.

This event will be on the South West end of post. It is wooded and rugged and closly resembles the jungles of New Georgia.  Cost for the event will be 25.00 pre registered and 35.00 Walk - on's at the event.
To Pre-registrer by Pay Pal go to your Pay Pal Acct. and use;thirdarmyhistoricalsociety@yahoo.com
Both Army and Marine units will participate. You will be in the Field and there is ample place to set your tent up. and there is rest rooms avalable at registration. So bring your Rations and plenty of ammo!!
EVENT POC; Dave Weakley, dwweakley@yahoo.com

Directions to the south gate State Rd 46 (Jonathon Moore Pike) to 325 W. turn right on 325 W.then go to 100 N. turn left on 100 N.( W George Town Rd.) go to the South Gate
Or S.R. 46 to 500 W. turn right to George Town Rd. turn left to the South Gate.

Info on the campain
Before 1942 hardly anybody had ever heard of New Georgia, and after 1943 few people would ever hear of it again. Nothing important had ever happened there before, and nothing important afterwards. But for an intense five-month period from June through November 1943, the New Georgia Group of islands would see fierce fighting on land, sea and in the air—and some of the worst American strategic and tactical planning of the war.
The New Georgia Group in the Central Solomons, on the west side of “The Slot,” is 125 miles long and 40 miles wide. It includes 12 large habitable islands, several dozen small ones, barrier islands, fringing coral reefs and innumerable uncharted coral heads. Like most of the other large Solomon Islands, the New Georgia group is thickly covered by some of the most difficult jungle terrain in the world. So thick is the top canopy that twilight prevails even in broad daylight. The ground beneath is covered with many steep ridges and small rivers—most of which are unseen in aerial photography. Where the terrain flattens near the coastline and the rivers deposit silt carried down from the interior highlands, mangrove swamps usually result. Just south of the equator, the islands are always hot and rainy, with high daytime temperatures often in excess of 100 degrees. Humidity runs near 100%, and as a result the usual tropical diseases, malaria and dengue fever, proliferate. Constant moisture promotes many debilitating fungal skin conditions, commonly referred to as “jungle rot.” Metal rusts seemingly overnight, and in WW II cloth and leather literally rotted off the soldiers’ equipment. In 1943 there were virtually no trails or roads in the interiors of these islands, and when they were eventually cut, the passage of even a company-sized unit turned the footing into a sea of mud. The only large low flat area on New Georgia was the former copra plantation zone around Munda airfield near the south tip of its northwest corner.

This event will be on the South West end of post. It is wooded and rugged and closly resembles the jungles of New Georgia.  Cost for the event will be 25.00 pre registered and 35.00 Walk - on's at the event.
To Pre-registrer by Pay Pal go to your Pay Pal Acct. and use;thirdarmyhistoricalsociety@yahoo.com
Both Army and Marine units will participate. You will be in the Field and there is ample place to set your tent up. and there is rest rooms avalable at registration. So bring your Rations and plenty of ammo!!
EVENT POC; Dave Weakley, dwweakley@yahoo.com

Directions to the south gate State Rd 46 (Jonathon Moore Pike) to 325 W. turn right on 325 W.then go to 100 N. turn left on 100 N.( W George Town Rd.) go to the South Gate
Or S.R. 46 to 500 W. turn right to George Town Rd. turn left to the South Gate.

Info on the campain
Before 1942 hardly anybody had ever heard of New Georgia, and after 1943 few people would ever hear of it again. Nothing important had ever happened there before, and nothing important afterwards. But for an intense five-month period from June through November 1943, the New Georgia Group of islands would see fierce fighting on land, sea and in the air—and some of the worst American strategic and tactical planning of the war.
The New Georgia Group in the Central Solomons, on the west side of “The Slot,” is 125 miles long and 40 miles wide. It includes 12 large habitable islands, several dozen small ones, barrier islands, fringing coral reefs and innumerable uncharted coral heads. Like most of the other large Solomon Islands, the New Georgia group is thickly covered by some of the most difficult jungle terrain in the world. So thick is the top canopy that twilight prevails even in broad daylight. The ground beneath is covered with many steep ridges and small rivers—most of which are unseen in aerial photography. Where the terrain flattens near the coastline and the rivers deposit silt carried down from the interior highlands, mangrove swamps usually result. Just south of the equator, the islands are always hot and rainy, with high daytime temperatures often in excess of 100 degrees. Humidity runs near 100%, and as a result the usual tropical diseases, malaria and dengue fever, proliferate. Constant moisture promotes many debilitating fungal skin conditions, commonly referred to as “jungle rot.” Metal rusts seemingly overnight, and in WW II cloth and leather literally rotted off the soldiers’ equipment. In 1943 there were virtually no trails or roads in the interiors of these islands, and when they were eventually cut, the passage of even a company-sized unit turned the footing into a sea of mud. The only large low flat area on New Georgia was the former copra plantation zone around Munda airfield near the south tip of its northwest corner.




New Georgia

Before 1942 hardly anybody had ever heard of New Georgia, and after 1943 few people would ever hear of it again. Nothing important had ever happened there before, and nothing important afterwards. But for an intense five-month period from June through November 1943, the New Georgia Group of islands would see fierce fighting on land, sea and in the air—and some of the worst American strategic and tactical planning of the war.
 
The New Georgia Group in the Central Solomons, on the west side of “The Slot,” is 125 miles long and 40 miles wide. It includes 12 large habitable islands, several dozen small ones, barrier islands, fringing coral reefs and innumerable uncharted coral heads. Like most of the other large Solomon Islands, the New Georgia group is thickly covered by some of the most difficult jungle terrain in the world. So thick is the top canopy that twilight prevails even in broad daylight. The ground beneath is covered with many steep ridges and small rivers—most of which are unseen in aerial photography. Where the terrain flattens near the coastline and the rivers deposit silt carried down from the interior highlands, mangrove swamps usually result.
 
Just south of the equator, the islands are always hot and rainy, with high daytime temperatures often in excess of 100 degrees. Humidity runs near 100%, and as a result the usual tropical diseases, malaria and dengue fever, proliferate. Constant moisture promotes many debilitating fungal skin conditions, commonly referred to as “jungle rot.” Metal rusts seemingly overnight, and in WW II cloth and leather literally rotted off the soldiers’ equipment.
 
 In 1943 there were virtually no trails or roads in the interiors of these islands, and when they were eventually cut, the passage of even a company-sized unit turned the footing into a sea of mud. The only large low flat area on New Georgia was the former copra plantation zone around Munda airfield near the south tip of its northwest corner.

ATTENTION

 Please direct any questions to the  

 Event Coordinator - Dave Weakley dwweakley@yahoo.com or

you may also contact the Third Army Historical Society at:

thirdarmyhistoricalsociety@yahoo.com